Find the fascinating on the Far South Coast

ON THE WING: A juvenile white bellied sea-eagle soars above the Far South Coast. Photo: Neill Hayes
ON THE WING: A juvenile white bellied sea-eagle soars above the Far South Coast. Photo: Neill Hayes

Birds of prey, or raptors, have always held a fascination for mankind, with their magnificent flying capabilities, power and other attributes.

Raptors are distinguished by their large strong beaks, powerful curved talons, and extraordinary binocular vision. This enables the birds to detect prey from vast distances even while in flight.

They are predatory carnivores, hunting and feeding on rodents and other small mammals, birds, reptiles, insects and amphibians.

The most widespread of Australia’s 27 species is the white-bellied sea eagle, which we see along the coast, often in pairs. Their enormous nests are often seen high in the trees in the coastal areas.  

They eagles feed mainly on aquatic animals, such as fish, turtles and sea snakes, but will also consume small mammals, birds and carrion.

The Far South Coast Birdwatchers club organises walks on the second Saturday and fourth Sunday of each month, which provide an opportunity to spot many of these birds.

You can find details on the website, fscb.org.au, and the club is also on Facebook and Twitter.